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FOLIO: Facilitated Online Learning as an Interactive Opportunity
 

Maximising the impact of your service (Maxim)

 

About Maxim...

 

Welcome to the 'Maximising the impact of your service' (Maxim) web pages.  Maxim is an online interactive course funded by the National Library for Health, that is being delivered by email and Web pages as part of the FOLIO Programme.

 

The Maxim course began on Monday 2nd February 2009 and will end on Friday 27th March 2009. To keep track of the course, see the Maxim archive. To see an outline of course materials and exercises, see the Maxim course timetable.

 

Course aim...
 
This course aims to equip you with the skills and knowledge required to successfully maximise the impact of your service and to effectively evaluate this impact.
 
Course objectives:
 
By the end of this course participants will be able to:
 
  • Define the concept of maximising impact as it relates to delivery of health information and library services.
  • Identify key user groups.
  • Assess and evaluate the needs of  users.
  • Identify and measure the value of their service.
  • Present impact data. 

 

Maxim Course Materials...

 

Key materials:

 

 

Portfolio Submission Instructions

 

Briefings

What is impact

Importance of maximising impact

Knowing your users: analysing impact

Adding service value

Impact measurement 

Monitoring impact

Presenting your data

 

Useful References

 

For more information about impact in information and library services, see the following resources:

 

  • Doney, L. (2006). Evaluating the impact of a project promoting library and information services to primary care in Nottingham, UK. Health Information and Lbraries Journal 23 (1): 64-68.
  • Johnson, I.M. et al. (2004). Impact evaluation, professional practice, and policy making. New Library World 105 (1-2): 33-46.
  • Markless, S. and Streatfield, D.(2006).Evaluating the impact of your library. London: Facet Publishing. ISBN: 978-1-85604-488-2.
  • Markless, S. and Streatfield, D.(2006). Gathering and applying evidence of the impact of UK university libraries on student learning and research: A facilitated action research approach. International Journal of Information Management 26 (1): 3-15 
  • Markless, S. and Streatfield, D. (2008). Supporting self-evaluation in assessing the impact of HE libraries. Performance Measurement and Metrics 9 (1): 38-47.
  • Marshal, J. G. (2007). Measuring the value and impact of health library and information services: past reflections, future possibilities. Health Information and Libraries Journal 24 (1): 4-17. 
  • Streatfield, D. et al. (2000). Best Value and Better Performance in Libraries. (Library and Information Commission Research Report 52). Middlesex: Information Management Associates. Available from: http://www.informat.org/bstvlmen.html [Accessed January 2009]
  • Trinder, V.M. et al (2007). Evaluating the impact of library user training programmes across Thames Valley Strategic Health Authority in the UK. Health Information and Libraries Journal 24 (1): 34-40.
  • Urquhart, C. et al(2007). Developing a toolkit for assessing the impact of health library services on patient care.  Aberystwyth:  Department of Information Studies, Aberystwyth University. Available from: http://www.library.nhs.uk/nlhdocs/impactstudyreport_nov07.doc [Accessed January 2009]
  • Urquhart, C. and Weightman, A. (2008). Assessing the impact of a health library service: best practice guidance. Based on research originally funded by LKDN (now sponsored by National Library for Health. Available from: http://www.library.nhs.uk/forlibrarians/toolkits/impacttoolkit [Accessed January 2009] 
  • Wavell, C. et al. (2002). Impact evaluation of museums, archives and libraries: available evidence project. Aberdeen: The Robert Gordon University. Available from: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/files/imreport.pdf [Accessed January 2009]
  • Weightman, A. L. & Williamson, J. (2005) The value and impact of information provided through library services for patient care: a systematic review. Health Information and Libraries Journal 22 (1): 4-25.
  • Williams, D. A. et al. (2005). Implementing impact evaluation in professional practice: a study of needs within the museum, archive and library sector. International Journal of Information Management 25 (6): 533-548. 

 

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